Friday, May 22, 2020

Reagan s Scandal Of The Iran Contra Scandal - 918 Words

Vanessa Acheampong-Tieku US History B Band Due: Tuesday May 31, 2016 11th grade History PBA Reagan’s Scandal of the Iran Contra Scandal: Detecting Brave Politics and testing boundaries Question: Did President Ronald Reagan know about the decision by White House aide Oliver North and National Security Advisor John Poindexter to divert profits from sales to Iran to buy weapons for rebels? Why did President Ronald Reagan change his opinions about his knowledge of his role in the Iran Contra Scandal? Almost twenty years after the notorious Watergate scandal, the Iran Contra Affair took the nation by storm in the 1980s. It was a grand plan that violated American law and policy altogether as it undermined the public trust in government†¦show more content†¦From 1936 until 1979, Nicaragua was ruled by two dictators, Somoza Garcia and his son Anastasio Somoza Debayle until the Sandinista rebels seized power in 1979. The new regime sparked unpopular remarks among the Nicaraguans, giving rise to a counter-revolution, who later became known as the Contras. Because of the new regime’s support towards the Soviet stance, the Reagan administration decided to support the Contras and provide them with financial and material support. The year 1979 also witnessed the overthrow of Iran’s authoritarian ruler, Mohammad Raza Shah Pehlavi, commonly known as Shah. Shah’s relationship with the U.S. flourished over time as his government grew increasingly pro-Western as it sought to modernize the country and burnish its international image. However, as Shah’s relationship with the U.S. strengthened and his international profile grew, many of his own people grew dissatisfied with his leadership. In 1978, riots and demonstrations broke out across the country, and by 1979 these protests increased in frequency, power, and violence. Mohammad Raza Shah Pehlavi secular and U.S friendly government was replaced by fundamentalist radical, Ayatollah Khomeini. While Khomeini tried to break all ties with the U.S, the U.S. quickly tried to improve their relations with the new government. Iran was a key ally needed in the Middle East as it played a

Friday, May 8, 2020

A Short History Of Confucianism And Confucianism - 1196 Words

Daniel Meltzer ASST 101 Professor Dimick 23 November 2014 A Short History of Confucianism Confucianism is a way of life propagated by the Chinese philosopher Confucius in the 6th–5th century BCE, and it has been followed by the Chinese for more than 2000 years. Although Confucianism as changed over time, at its core, it is still places the same emphasis on the substance of learning, the source of values, and the social code of the Chinese. Additionally, the influence of Confucianism has extended to other countries such as Korea, Japan, and Vietnam. While Confucianism is sometimes viewed as a philosophy or religion, Confucianism is probably best understood as a sort of all-encompassing way of thinking and living, which includes such practices as: ancestor reverence and human-centered religiousness over that of the environment. While people all over Asia can argue that they are Shintoists, Daoists, Buddhists, Muslims, or Christians, but, by announcing their religious affiliations, very rarely do they stop practicing a Confucian way of life in addition to their religious affiliation. Although Confucianism is often grouped with the major historical religions, Confucianism differs from them in that it is not an organized religion. Regardless of this fact, Confucianism has spread to other East Asian countries under the influence of Chinese literate culture and has exerted a huge influence on their spiritual, cultural, and political life. Both the theory and practice ofShow MoreRelated Confucianism Essay example1262 Words   |  6 PagesConfucianism The religion of Confucianism is and interesting and unique religion. The various parts of this belief system deal more with humanity than with deities or supernatural occurrences. It is this fact that leads many to believe that Confucianism is more a philosophy or way of life than a religion. There are, however, various ceremonies and beliefs that those who follow Confucianism observe. In short, Confucianism has had more impact on the lives of the Chinese than any other single religionRead MoreThe Impact of Confucius on the Development of Chinese Thought and Culture1528 Words   |  7 PagesThe impact Confucius had on the development of Chinese thought and culture Confucianism has been a part of Chinese culture for over a thousand years. Many who have studied Confucianism would say that it is not a religion. It is better described as a philosophy or moral code. The philosophy of Confucianism comes mainly from the speeches and writings of Confucius, a great Chinese thinker and educator. He believed that Humanity, Rite, Neutrality, Virtue, Education, and Cultivation were the basisRead MoreEssay on Confucianism vs. Buddhism1607 Words   |  7 PagesConfucianism vs. Buddhism By Robert Truckle In this essay, two world religions will be compared to see how similar and/or how different they are; these two religions are Confucianism and Buddhism. Confucianism speaks about the wise thoughts that Confucius came across throughout his life. Buddhism speaks about how to acquire great knowledge throughout life. Confucianism was founded by a Chinese man, but Buddhism was founded by an Indian man. These quick comparisons show how the religions differRead MoreThe Night Watches Of The Buddha1747 Words   |  7 PagesQuestion 3 Compare, contrast and exemplify the role of Chi in Daoism and Confucianism thought This research will compare, contrast and exemplify the role of Chi in Daoism and Confucianism thought. Firstly, this research compares these two religion’s basic practice and to see both belief and practice. Then this research examines how both religions interpret the role of Chi and Confucianism thought. Both Taoism and Confucianism are originated in China and both visits in Temple to pay homage to theirRead MoreConfusion About Confucianism : Everything Is One1419 Words   |  6 PagesConfusion about Confucianism: Everything is one As Confucius said, â€Å"Virtue is not left to stand alone. He who practices it will have neighbors.† How can one affect the others? What will be lost if one element is missing? In Confucianism, there are the five constants (Ren, Yi, Zhi, Xin, and Li), each correlates with others; however, the main focus is the practice of Ren and Filial Piety, which can transform us into Jun Zi. Confucius suggests that all practices are related to each other, and missingRead MoreThe Core Philosophy Of Confucianism1223 Words   |  5 Pageshave opportunities to raise their rights after the oppression of thousands years. For those centuries, Confucianism plays the dominating role in terms of the China politics and culture. The core philosophy of Confucianism is to enforce the stabilization of agriculture society and politics. Hence, it became popular and be promoted by Chinese and other East Asian monarchs in history. Confucianism requires or forces women to be loyalty to their husband a nd hyper sexuality of women is absolutely notRead MoreConfucianism And Its Influence On Chinese History1713 Words   |  7 Pagesas Confucius, was an iconic figure in the Chinese history. He was a teacher, a philosopher, and also the founder of Confucianism. Confucius’ philosophies, on the other hand, would became well known as Confucianism. Confucianism can be considered as an ancient Chinese philosophy as well as a popular religion in the Chinese history. It is known to be a way of life taught by Confucius. Although being transformed over a long period of time, Confucianism is still the source of values and the social codeRead MoreThe Role and Status of Women in Buddhism and Confucianism Essay1186 Words   |  5 Pagesreligion in the word is known to be controversial. In Buddhism and Confucianism, women are seen as unequal and some of their belief promotes gender inequality. As outsiders of both main Chinese religions, we wonder how women put up with the gender inequalities. Women go through with the inequalities because they respect their faith and believe deeply in the teachings of Buddha for Buddhism, and Confucius for Confucianism. Much research and also thought has been put together to obtain trueRead More Confucius and Confucianism Essay788 Words   |  4 Pagesunsettled. The rulers were catastrophic, and Confucius thought the only way to keep life in order was for everyone to go back to traditional principles. He wanted China to go back to the quiet days of the sage Kings. This was a time in Chinese history when Kings ruled organized kingdoms. They were peaceful because everyone knew their place in life and acted accordingly. Confucius taught in his school his beliefs about respecting family and ancestors for many years. His theoriesRead MoreThe Revival Of Confucian Ethics1269 Words   |  6 PagesConfucius origin, thus, demonstrating a need for preservation of Neo-Confucianism ethics in their society. The success of the Korean educational system is credited to being influenced through Confucianism, resulting in the â€Å"educational fever† that has encompassed South Korea. When Confucianism was introduced during the Chosà »n Dynasty (1392-1910) it originally served as a way to maintain power for the upperclassmen. However, Confucianism began to replace the influence of Buddhism, leaving in its place

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Bank of Canada Monetary Policy Free Essays

On the contrary to the policies of the United States, material about Canada’s monetary policy was easily accessible on the Bank of Canada website, straight-forward and easy to understand. It’s clear that their target audience is the average Canadian citizen. They didn’t give the ‘run-around’ so- to- speak, of what their main objectives are, and much of it was watered down so that anyone could comprehend it. We will write a custom essay sample on Bank of Canada Monetary Policy or any similar topic only for you Order Now The Bank focuses on keeping inflation low, stable and predictable in order to encourage long-term investments for citizens to contribute to lasting economic growth, the creation of jobs and increased productivity – which will ultimately improve standard of living. This strategy is encompassed by the inflation control target that was adopted by the Bank of Canada in 1991, which sets a control range of 1-3 percent, ideally with a 2 percent midpoint. And, looking at historical statistics since its inception, the Bank has been able to maintain this control effectively. For example, inflation rate for 1Q 2013 was 1. 3%. According to the Bank, this monetary policy is implemented by influencing short-term interest rates which is done by raising or lowering the target for the overnight rate. In the end, a reduction in the policy rate, or easing of monetary policy, can be expected to boost total demand for Canadian goods and services, and vice versa. In addition to this, another goal for the Bank is maintaining flexible exchange rates – which they consider best suited for achieving their inflation target. The floating Canadian dollar provides an exchange rate buffer which allows the economy to absorb and adjust to economic shocks it may encounter. Though additional factors like exchange rates and unemployment seem to be important to policy makers, they are not focused on as intently as inflation and little information is available in regard to them. Their thinking is that monetary policy cannot have a systematic and sustained effect on any other variable, thus making it senseless to adopt any other long-term targets. It seems apparent that the Canadian policy strives to remain â€Å"forward looking† in a sense. The Bank places much of its emphasis on long-lasting shocks to the economy, rather than those believed to be short lived. By attempting to keep inflation close to their target, they consider themselves better able to respond to changes in the economic environment in such a way to avoid situations of excess demand or upply. Thus, pressures of inflation rising or falling are kept to a minimum. There’s much argument surrounding whether or not Canada’s policy is really that good or if they have just been lucky over the years. Volatility has increased in the Canadian economy over the years, however, they believe that their â€Å"exceptional† economic performance was the result of an even greater imp rovement in monetary policy and the policy offset the volatile environment, resulting in greater macroeconomic performance. It’s especially important to the Bank to remain credible to the Canadian people by being open and clear about their policy choices. They feel that this credibility keeps expectations to preserve future inflation close to the target and this â€Å"anchors† them to ensure that it happens. Even though Canada’s approach to communicating its monetary policy is much different than that of the United States, one could argue that they may be ‘putting blinders’ on their citizens, to avoid poor performance in other areas. Is their layman, tunnel vision approach regarding inflation control diverting the public from questioning whether or not it the best framework to utilize to drive the economy in a positive direction? The Canadian economy is still struggling to recover from the Great Recession and is trying to find ways in order to avoid the zero lower bound issue, but they put little importance communicating on how they are going to do so with the public. How to cite Bank of Canada Monetary Policy, Papers

Monday, April 27, 2020

Why was Britain gripped by widespread social disorder during 1919 Essay Example

Why was Britain gripped by widespread social disorder during 1919 Essay In 1919, against a background of worldwide violence and unrest involving people of African dissent, there occurred in Britain a series of racial riots and incidents, which in their severity and extent were unlike anything that had gone before1. There were riots in; Barry, Cardiff, Glasgow, Liverpool, London, Newport and South Shields. The motives behind these race riots are hard to establish because there are so many different crucial factors for the social disorder in 1919. I intend to divide the question up based on the key words or phrases in the question, I will particularly focus on the race riots in Liverpool. It will always be difficult regardless of the period to try and understand peoples mental motivations for things such as riots and racial attacks when one is not in that society, just as today we find it hard to understand or sympathize with racial attacks. However there are elements that could and presumably did contribute to the heightened tensions of 1919 that reached its zenith with the race riots in the summer months, including; the First world war, popular opinion, jealously and innate and socialized racism. In the year 1919 the nation was literally in turmoil, the period itself was a transitional one being after the first world war and this formed what I believe to be one of the crucial factors in the race riots in 1919. It is possible to underestimate the immense effect the literal first world war would have had on society. Men were trained to be soldiers and a key feature of army training is to dehumanize and demoralize men, so they will be institutionalized therefore more effective and obedient soldiers. We will write a custom essay sample on Why was Britain gripped by widespread social disorder during 1919 specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on Why was Britain gripped by widespread social disorder during 1919 specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on Why was Britain gripped by widespread social disorder during 1919 specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer This must have had an overtly negative effect on the situations leading up to the race riots. The men may have possibly through trench warfare been more accustomed to violence and have less of a respect for the sanctity of human life and possessions and they would have been more willing to resort to violence. There was also a firm idea of Britishness instilled in to the soldiers of the First World War. Undoubtedly men who fought for king and country were more concerned with this idea, and wold want to preserve British culture and a pure race. There was also the element of colonialism, England as a colonial power was thought to be above those countries and areas it controlled, and therefore there was a lack of respect for other races. Another possible yet hypothetical argument could possibly be that of racism in the army. There have been numerous cases of racism and possibly this is a way of thinking believed by many who serve, this may have affected the way men thought about those of ethnic or racial minorities. Undoubtedly war had unleashed demons that couldnt be tamed and British men ( it is hard to know about the women) were more ready to use violence. There had been many precedents before the 1919 riots, therefore the riotous nature of the cities is an element in the fracases. There had been major anti-German and anti Jewish riots previously. The armistice celebrations in 1918 had degenerated into riot and disorder. The 1911 Transport strike showed the industry militancy spilling into violence. There was also riots in May 1915 at the sinking of the Lucitania Ship and the 1918 end of the war celebrations descended into mad looting and celebrations. Liverpool in particular had a history of riotous behavior. There had been five major riots in Liverpool, 1911,1915,1919, police riots. Once a riot starts it is opportunity that spurs a lot of people on to commit crimes that they would not usually commit. It is possible that there became an opportunistic element to the riots with different groups in society taking advantage of the disorder and the pressure on the police force to loot and attack. It is probable that there were many people involved in the riots that werent directly affected by the implied problems of immigration. It was those seafarers who were directly involved. However it is reported that there were over 6000 people rioting, I believe it is not possible for all 6000 to be involved in the seafarer industry therefore some must have been opportunistic rioters, such as the younger gangs of children who were often active in initiating the disturbances. Rioting recently in other countries such as Russia worried the government and, produced a feeling that social dissent happening in one part of the world had a direct effect on another2. Also once the rioting started in Britain their was a ripple effect with other port inhabitants seeing riot as an acceptable way to vent their anger at the injustices that that government made on a minority group. After the First World War there was an uncertainty felt by many, this specific context is incredibly important as to why the riots began. There was such a huge element of politics involved. The 1918 khaki election was directly in the aftermath of the First World War. The election rhetoric was highly confusing, they talked about the fruits of the British peoples labor and payments for their war time effort. There was never a specific line set out, the population was waiting with baited breath. One slogan that many picked up on was the, homes for heroes. This social policy intended to replace the urban slums with fresh housing stock. In reality there was a shortage of houses so many were facing the possibility homelessness which dramatically increased the tension especially in Liverpool and London. Looking at the race riots specifically in Liverpool it is possible to see how all these wider issues coupled with local problems led to the race riots; the significance of unemployment among seamen as a casual factor of the 1919 disorder similar episodes occurred among other sea faring communities. 3The long-term effects were important, chiefly that of economics. The Seafarers had returned to the ports and there was huge competition for jobs since thousands of immigrants had been imported to fill those spaces vacated by the British servicemen. There were reported incidents where Black British citizens and immigrants were turned away from jobs in order to employ British servicemen. It has been estimated that between November 1918 and March 1919 over 2,100,000 ranks had been de-mobilized. 4, There was a reported population of 3000 black seafarers in Liverpool coupled with the Chinese and Filipino workers, unemployment levels were huge. In some factories white workers refused to work along side black workers, so they were dismissed and replaced with white workers. An interesting point however is that the Seafarers didnt object to working along Scandinavians, so it was not a case of nationality it was purely defined by the color of the skin, which could suggest that it wasnt xenophobia. Another element that caused resentment was that foreign seafarers were employed for less than British men, this undercutting then forced the British workers wages down, laborers believed that blacks usurped whites through their acceptance of lower wages 5. This was also a problem that dated back to the 1880s and there is evidence of xenophobic behavior backed up by the unions. Linked to the dire economic situation was the perceived ideas about the wealth of black resident.. It was a popular thought that the black community had benefited from the war. Some black residents had purchased houses and this was thought to be unacceptable while white demobilized soldiers were homeless. However Jenkinson argues that, while primarily rooted in economic grievances, breaking out again in the early 1920s when the fortunes of the merchant shipping industry fell even lower as the post war recession set in therefore if] economic competition directly provoked riots, reinforces the notion that racial antagonism rather than a basic cause of the violence, was entrenched in the superstructure of Britain at this time. 7 Inter racial sexual relations was another element that heavily influenced the riots. The fear of miscegenation was picked up by the popular press and was almost used as an excuse for the racism. This is particularly evident in Liverpool and London where this is mentioned as a motive from the outset. 8 Sexual relations possibly angered the white population for a number of reasons. Firstly they could have been intimidated and jealous of the reality that they had been away and life had carried on without them. Secondly after fighting the war for Britain the ex-servicemen were possibly more patriotic and wanted to keep the idea of Britishness and a pure white race, even though this was never admitted openly. This issue was highly contended all over the country not just in the port towns. There were numerous newspaper articles perceiving this was a problem, even broad sheets felt threatened by the idea of white women marrying or engaging in sexual relations with black men. Jenkinson believes that, black men and white women was mentioned as an anathema, and soon the stress was laid on savage instincts of the black man9. This is also highlighted in the Liverpool Courier; the average Negro is nearer the animal than is the average white man, and that there are women in Liverpool who have no self respect. 10 However it is important to note the hypocritical element in this argument because there was reported to be over 600,000 half-caste children in South Africa due to white servicemen engaging in sexual relations with the native women. Rowe makes the interesting point that the feelings of miscegenation may not have been a prominent cause for the riot within the working class communities, it is possible the opinion of the middleclass journalists who reported on the race riots in the press. 11 The second element of the question is the idea of rioting in the whole of Britain. There was disorder in 1919 in Ireland, Scotland, Wales and England. In Ireland and Scotland, the rioting was not racially orientated, however its influence is evident. Glasgow saw social unrest in the early months of 1919. There was a General Strike to attempt to petition for a 40 hour week. However it was the governments reaction that had a negative effect. The industry in Glasgow was paralyzed and the government feared that the protesters could turn revolutionary (influenced possibly by other countrys as mentioned earlier). The government sent in army troops and tanks showing that they didnt want disturbances to the peace at any cost however it served to make the demonstrations more violent and made residents more disillusioned with the government. Ireland also suffered riots in January. The IRA assassinated the RIC, this was the first moment the IRA used an assassin as a weapon and it deeply shocked Ireland. The unrest continued with the banning of Dail Eoreann and Sinn Fein. South Wales suffered race riots due to its ports prominent position. Britain as a whole had a unison of innate racist attitudes (as I mentioned earlier) even if institutionalized and subverted. However the police force, the government and popular press were all guilty of racism. This can be seen in the arresting of black men in Liverpool and Cardiff, The initial arrest of black men, soon followed by the dropping of charges before trial, the finding not-guilty verdicts and convictions for lesser offences. This suggests that many of the arrests made in 1919 were because of the color of the mens skin and not because of their actions. 12 The government showed racist actions by the solution of repatrinisation and deportation. This shows a lack of compassion and one would say racist mentality towards those that were originally employed to help with the war effort. The popular presss biass were shown through their racist headlines and the focus on crimes committed by black people rather than those white people who started the riots. Therefore Britain as a whole appeared to identify with the ideas expressed by the seafarers, and this popular moral support would have probably encouraged the riotous behavior. The idea that the British people were gripped by the riots is an easy thing to believe and this is also an important element to the rioting. The psychological theory of crowd behaviorism is believed by many to explain football hooliganism, but it can also be applied to the race riots of 1919. There is a group identify felt by a riotous mob, a feeling of belonging and union which would make some have the courage to do things that they would never do on their own. There is also the element of the invisible man effect. This states that when a member of a group, individuals feel that they are not recognizable and they are therefore more inclined to act violently. It is possible, looking at Liverpool that the mob felt a group identity and so were willing to act violently. Finally it is important to question why ethnic and racial minorities were the victims in riots. Racial minorities were used as scapegoats for political problems and the governments inability to cope with the extra citizens after the war. The seafarers were also jealous of the minorities and threatened by them; when the shortage evaporated, post war economic crisis, colored semen were seen as being in direct competition and became objects of hostility. 13 Xenophobia, imperialism, jingoism influenced popular opinion; The effect of the colonial experience in the growth of racism had a dual impact racial theories were used to legitimize relationships of dominance and disability within the empire. On the other hand the very achievement of military superiority and administrative control over the colonized peoples fed back to the metropolis in the form of stereotypes mythologies a nd ideologies which confirmed the supposed superiority of the Anglo-Saxon race. 14 This point is highlighted by the participation of young boys in the riots, they possibly partly opportunistic, but undoubtedly the influence of older working friends and parents would be immeasurable and influenced racism in the next generation. The idea that society was fundamentally racist holds more weight when the beginning of the riot is observed. Jenkinson comments that; For two to three weeks before the wide scale violence of Liverpools racial riots in June 1919, blacks had been the object of attacks by whites police raided an illegal black gambling house. 15 She goes on to describe a disturbance between blacks and Scandinavians which resulted in the death of a black man, Charles Wotton. Jenkinson stresses that, while the initial fracas involved less than two dozen blacks and Scandinavians, very soon the native population became involved16, which suggests those racist feelings were looking for an outlet, which they found. There were many causes for the riots in 1919, they were much more than simply racially inspired17. Jenkinson argues that it would be wrong to pin the causes on white fear and prejudice, it was in fact much more than that covering a number of social and economic issues. The war effected the way people thought and they were more willing to use force, which became crucial when the riots began. Unemployment, lack of housing and the governments false promises of money and homes fit for heroes just frustrated and angered the British population, who then turned their attentions on to the minority groups who they perceived to be benefiting at the expense of themselves. The previous rioting had an effect and made the riots more inevitable. Britain undoubtedly became gripped by the riots and many would have joined in because it was the popular thin at the time. The workers not having a way to express their anger would have also contributed to the frustration that heightened the tensions in 1919. The issue of inter racial sex was perceived to be a main causation however that notion has now being questioned and it is thought that, racism in Britain is deeply rooted in the mode of domination cemented by the imperial heritage. 18. Even thought the race riots were caused by factors other than racism, ultimately it turned in to a racist witch-hunt which cumulated in deportation of many valuable members of British society, all in the name of British Imperialism.

Thursday, March 19, 2020

Free Essays on Life Of Picasso

Pablo Picasso Pablo Picasso was born in Malaga in 1881. Pablo was the son of a respected art teacher, and due to his father’s influence, young Pablo entered the Academy at Barcelona at age 14. This was where he painted his first great work, â€Å"Girl with Bare Feet†. After two years of schooling, Picasso transferred for advanced tutelage. This did not hold Picasso’s interest, so instead he spent much of his time in cafes and in brothels. Three years later, Picasso won a gold medal for his work, â€Å"Customs of Aragon†. This work was displayed on exhibit in Picasso’s hometown. In 1901, Picasso set up a studio in the northern section of Paris known as Montmartre. Picasso had mastered traditional forms of art by now. However, the works of such artists as Toulouse-Lautrec, Degas, Vuillard, which can be noticed, affected him in his works at the time. â€Å"Longchamp† and â€Å"The Blue Room† are good examples of this change in Picasso’s style. Soon after this, Picasso began to develop his own methods. Illness struck Picasso in 1898 and he temporarily retired from the city and rested in the country. Upon his return, Picasso was distressed with modern art and proceeded to use mother’s maiden name. He then underwent a distressing part of his life for the next 4 years (1901-1904) and demonstrated the life of the poor. The next two years following those last four were rather bright and vigorous. Perhaps this was because he realized how his life differed so much from the poor on the streets. This was also a point in Picasso’s life when sculpture and black art intrigued him. His work, â€Å"Two Nudes† reflects this attitude. Cubism soon followed after this. Picasso began experimenting with the many facets of Cubism. Cubism was developed in stages: analytic, synthetic, hermetic, and rococo. These techniques were not only useful in painting but in collages as well. Picasso met Eva Marcelle Humbert, and fell in love with her bu... Free Essays on Life Of Picasso Free Essays on Life Of Picasso Pablo Picasso Pablo Picasso was born in Malaga in 1881. Pablo was the son of a respected art teacher, and due to his father’s influence, young Pablo entered the Academy at Barcelona at age 14. This was where he painted his first great work, â€Å"Girl with Bare Feet†. After two years of schooling, Picasso transferred for advanced tutelage. This did not hold Picasso’s interest, so instead he spent much of his time in cafes and in brothels. Three years later, Picasso won a gold medal for his work, â€Å"Customs of Aragon†. This work was displayed on exhibit in Picasso’s hometown. In 1901, Picasso set up a studio in the northern section of Paris known as Montmartre. Picasso had mastered traditional forms of art by now. However, the works of such artists as Toulouse-Lautrec, Degas, Vuillard, which can be noticed, affected him in his works at the time. â€Å"Longchamp† and â€Å"The Blue Room† are good examples of this change in Picasso’s style. Soon after this, Picasso began to develop his own methods. Illness struck Picasso in 1898 and he temporarily retired from the city and rested in the country. Upon his return, Picasso was distressed with modern art and proceeded to use mother’s maiden name. He then underwent a distressing part of his life for the next 4 years (1901-1904) and demonstrated the life of the poor. The next two years following those last four were rather bright and vigorous. Perhaps this was because he realized how his life differed so much from the poor on the streets. This was also a point in Picasso’s life when sculpture and black art intrigued him. His work, â€Å"Two Nudes† reflects this attitude. Cubism soon followed after this. Picasso began experimenting with the many facets of Cubism. Cubism was developed in stages: analytic, synthetic, hermetic, and rococo. These techniques were not only useful in painting but in collages as well. Picasso met Eva Marcelle Humbert, and fell in love with her bu...

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

The Meaning of Frictional Unemployment

The Meaning of Frictional Unemployment Frictional unemployment is unemployment that comes from people moving between jobs, careers, and locations- in other words, unemployment that arises because most people dont enter into a new job immediately after exiting an old one (voluntarily or involuntarily). Frictional unemployment is not thought to be a big problem from a policy standpoint because it is entirely reasonable that people would take some time to find a job that is a good match rather than take the first opportunity that comes along.   Technology that helps to match workers with jobs and streamline the interview and hiring process most likely result  in the amount of frictional unemployment that exists in an economy. Terms related to Frictional Unemployment: UnemploymentCyclical UnemploymentStructural Unemployment You Might Also Be Interested In: Would 0% Unemployment Be a Good Thing?Globalization, Unemployment, and Recessions. What is the Link?Types of Unemployment Journal Articles on Frictional Unemployment: Information and Frictional UnemploymentMobility Costs, Frictional Unemployment, and EfficiencyJob Quitting and Frictional Unemployment

Saturday, February 15, 2020

Have recent reforms increased parliaments ability to hold the Essay

Have recent reforms increased parliaments ability to hold the executive to account - Essay Example ervation of separation of powers is essential as a check on autocratic power, further symbolised in the UK by the role of Parliament as a check on the executive. With regard to the UK position, the doctrine of the separation of powers has traditionally been limited and criticised for being somewhat unclear in comparison to other democracies3. Nevertheless, it has been commented that the doctrine does in fact influence everyday operations of the executive, legislature and judiciary4 and Barnett argues that â€Å"Separation of powers†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ runs like a thread throughout the constitution of the United Kingdom5.† Nevertheless, in the UK there has not been a clear separation of the branches of the state6, but rather a fusion. For example, the executive clearly carries out legislative functions and a prime example is the Law Commission. Although the Law Commission Act 1965 clearly requires the Commission to be â€Å"independent7† in reviewing law reform, its committee members are appointed by the Lord Chancellor who also grants prior approval to projects that the Law Commission will review. Additionally, the judiciary obtain their power from the Crown and there is a distinct overlap of functions between the powers, which should be separated for the effective application of the separation of powers and the efficacy of Parliament as check on the executive8. To address these inefficiencies in the constitutional notion of a separation of powers, the Government undertook what was propounded as the â€Å"biggest constitutional shake up for years9† asserted determination â€Å"to put the relationship between Executive, Legislature and Judiciary on a modern footing, respecting the separation of powers between the three10.† Official debate regarding this pledge culminated in the implementation of the Constitutional Reform Act 2005 (the Act), which was approved by both Houses on March 21, 2005, receiving Royal Assent on 24 March 2005. The Act introduced provisions for modifying